Legal Alerts

Legal Alerts

  • May 16, 2022
    Texas Supreme Court Clarifies When to Use But-For Causation Test in Medical Malpractice Case

    On Friday, May 13, 2022, the Texas Supreme Court issued an important opinion addressing but-for causation in Pediatrics Cool Care v. Ginger Thompson (o/b/o A.W.). In this case, tragically, the minor plaintiff A.W. committed suicide after seeing her pediatric healthcare provider and complaining of feelings of depression.

    Read more
  • May 13, 2022
    U.S. Sanctions on Russia and Post-Closing Obligations in M&A Transactions: “Dust-Off” Your Closing Binder

    The imposition of U.S. sanctions against Russia may impact the obligations of the parties following the closing of an agreement for the purchase and sale of equity interests or assets under circumstances that may not be anticipated.

    Read more
  • May 12, 2022
    Expanding Russia Sanctions and Export Restrictions Present Additional Risks for US Businesses

    Recent actions by both the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) continue to expand the scope of products and services covered by U.S. sanctions and export restrictions against Russia. The result is a widening net of risk for U.S. businesses that will require increased vigilance and compliance efforts.

    Read more
  • May 11, 2022
    Impact of Russia’s Intellectual Property Decree Against Businesses from “Unfriendly Countries”

    The Russian government – in an act that appears to be one of the first of its kind – passed a decree on March 7, 2022 allowing businesses in Russia to use the intellectual property (IP) rights of IP owners from “unfriendly countries” without paying compensation.

    Read more
  • May 11, 2022
    New Overtime Requirements for Oregon Agricultural Workers

    On April 18, 2022, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed HB 4002, which will begin, in 2023, a five-year phase-in process for Oregon employers to pay agricultural workers overtime requirements. In enacting this law, Oregon joins a handful of states – including California, Washington, and New York – that have removed exemptions to exclude agricultural workers from overtime laws.

    Read more
  • May 10, 2022
    California’s Push for Regulatory Clarity on Crypto Assets & Potential DFPI Enforcement Actions

    In an effort to promote regulatory clarity and establish a “comprehensive, thoughtful, and harmonized regulatory and business environment for crypto assets,” California Governor Gavin Newsom issued California Executive Order N-9-22 on May 4, 2022 (the Order). California is currently the largest hub in the United States for crypto and digital asset related companies and home to two of the largest cryptocurrency exchanges in the worl

    Read more
  • May 05, 2022
    Are Payments to a U.S. Company Through a Sanctioned Russian Bank Prohibited?

    In Executive Order 14204 of April 15, 2021 (E.O. 14024) (Order), the President found that specified harmful foreign activities of the Government of the Russian Federation, among other things, constituted an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States, and declared a national emergency to deal with that threat.

    Read more
  • May 04, 2022
    SEC Enforcement Case Ups the Ante on Corporate ESG Disclosures

    From the earliest days of the Biden Administration, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) signaled its intention to use all the tools at its disposal to address investor disclosures of Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) information. In March 2021, the SEC established a high-profile enforcement-focused Climate and ESG Task Force. Then, on April 11, 2022, the SEC published a proposed rule (with comments due by May 20, 2022) that will require detailed disclosures about greenhouse gas emissions, climate-related risks and targets, and corporate oversight and governance matters.

    Read more
Load More